Time for Real Protection – Real Safety – Real Surety

At AML Risk Management we consider the immediacy of risk. Government agencies such as the Police, ASIO and Defence Forces are assigned the role of providing accurate intelligence on potential threats and then acting appropriately. In Australia to date these agencies have demonstrated a very good record in both intelligence and in curtailing potentially disastrous activity by dissidents of all persuasions. At AML we see our role as the failsafe solution. Should parties with malicious or aggressive motives manage to bypass the authorities, AML can provide the equipment and expertise to both negate and neutralise such threats posed by these groups and individuals.

Many observers look at events such as the AFL football finals, the Spring Racing Carnival, the Moto Grand Prix at Phillip Island, the Melbourne Marathon and other major events as being likely targets for terrorist activity. From a publicity perspective, yes these events are the most attractive to groups such as ISIS. However from a logistical perspective, these are very difficult events for would be terrorists. All have very high security presence, multiple camera CCTV and a high Police presence. Bag searches, wanding and surveillance make large one off events very difficult targets.

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Consider pedestrian shopping malls, transport hubs and recreational locations. These areas are exposed. Any type of vehicle can cause very serious injury in the space of a few moments.

Consider what happened in Europe this summer. In Britain, small vans mowed down pedestrians on London Bridge with the occupants leaping out and randomly stabbing people. The Manchester bombing was at a theatre and the detonation was timed to cause maximum damage.

In Nice, and in Berlin, trucks were driven into festive crowds. The perpetrators deliberately pick what are largely uncontrolled inattentive crowds, in relatively easily accessed public spaces. This was again recently crudely and clumsily replicated in Spain.

Two things can alleviate such danger. Firstly a combination of fixed and permanent bollards with Crash Barriers installed specifically for the nominated events can almost totally negate any vehicular traffic other than authorised emergency and Police vehicles.

AML Risk Management supply and deploy a range of crash barriers. These units are designed to stop a vehicle moving at speed. Here is a video demonstrating how the unit works…

Secondly the AML team provide the most modern, up to date explosive detection devices available here in Australia. The devices are compact, portable and extremely accurate, with trained personnel operating the equipment.

Most importantly, the devices are mobile so there is no ‘checking station’. Should any suspicious package be found, AML have equipment and protocols that will ensure the effectiveness of any explosive device is minimised by 90%.

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Too many people focus on where the possible protagonists come from. Quite frankly it’s irrelevant after an attack is activated, and in 80% of cases so far, the bombers and terrorists are actually young misguided ‘home grown’ young men targeted by extremists from outside of to their local communities.

AML Risk Management take a common sense pragmatic approach to public safety and security. When contracted to do so it is our job to ensure the safety of families, of innocent people, innocent lives. If you would like to find out more please visit our website here or call us on 03 9326 2244.

Prepare, protect and provide a safe comfortable environment for the public.

AML Risk Management – The right choice.

 

Proactive rather than reactive response to terrorism – Israeli Expert

The AFL Finals series is here now and soon the Spring racing Carnival will be upon us are. This is an interesting perspective from an Israeli expert Brigadier General (Res) Nitzan Nuriel. In principle we can only agree. It is the preparation and preparedness that will protect the public from harm.

Explosive detection and crash barriers are essential. And as was evidenced in the Manchester bombing it is the time AFTER a major event that provides a cover of chaos. Here is the article . Consider it realistically. You will note he does not focus on the ethnicity, religion or background of terrorists. Rather he addresses the most important consideration – how to effectively deal with such a threat.

How to Prevent the Terrorism Threat from Disrupting Concerts and Sports Events?

The suicide bombing that struck a music concert in Manchester, England last night claimed the lives of 22 people and left 59 injured. In a special column, Brig. Gen. (res.) Nitzan Nuriel discusses the challenges of holding cultural and sporting events under the shadow of terror threats.

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One of the objectives of terrorism is to spread fear (terror) and anxiety among the general public to the point of disrupting everyday life. Major sports events, along with mass-audience cultural events (music concerts, festivals and so forth) have always been, and will always remain prime targets for terrorists owing to the extensive media coverage they receive.

Characteristically, the time and place of such an event are known and publicized well in advance. Massive crowds flock to these events, the public transport systems serving the venue where the event takes place are crowded and overloaded, and the process where the audience enters and leaves the venue leads to massive bottlenecks. All of these characteristics make mass-audience events a serious weakness and a preferred target for terrorist attacks. The primary question the authorities face when specific warnings have been received of imminent terrorist attacks is whether or not the event should be allowed to take place, whether it should be postponed, canceled or relocated to a different venue.

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The Israeli sports authorities were compelled to relocate international tournaments originally intended to be held in Israel to the neighboring island of Cyprus against the background of complex security situations. Similarly, states/teams scheduled to compete against Israeli teams took advantage of the same circumstances by demanding that tournaments be relocated from Israel to other, safer locations.

Recently, we encountered three situations where the tension between holding the match as planned and the option of postponing/canceling it evolved into a practical challenge. These situations involved the Israeli national football team in a match against Albania on November 8, 2015, the Maccabi Nahariya basketball team in a rematch in the context of the Euro Cup and a match in Turkey involving the Israeli football team Hapoel Be’er-Sheva. These are but a few examples from recent times where the dilemma was reported to the public, as there were many other examples involving different sports.

It should be noted that the ISA (Israel Security Agency – SHABAK) is the government organ responsible for authorizing or refusing such sports events. The ISA is required, along with the National Counterterrorism Bureau, to consolidate and submit a specific recommendation to the minister in charge. Naturally, there is always tension between the option of surrendering to terrorism by canceling the event and the option of taking the risk despite the concrete warnings.

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The terrorist organizations will be delighted to succeed in attacking international sports events generally and sports events involving Israeli participants in particular. As far as they are concerned, having the event canceled, postponed or relocated is a victory of sorts, achieved through a relatively minor effort. All they have to do is publish a video or some other electronic message that specifically threatens the event, and the organizers will start sweating when they ponder the dilemma of whether to allow the event to go ahead as planned or cancel it. If we accept this scenario, then terrorism will be able to disrupt our life almost effortlessly, in a manner where we will no longer be able to hold any events. A fabricated warning of a bomb planted at the venue where the event is about to take place will be sufficient to cause panic and lead to a postponement or even to cancellation.

So – what should be the appropriate policy for such circumstances? What can the organizers do to avoid a situation where the plans, and life itself, are unreasonably disrupted?

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I believe that the strength and resilience of a society that values life and its own survival, the risks notwithstanding, are measured – among other things – by its ability to maintain a planned routine of events. Does a basketball game or a football match justify taking risks involving human lives? Is it justified to take a risk when facing a tangible threat only to uphold the slogan “we will not allow terrorism to win and disrupt our life”? I believe that the organizers on behalf of the country hosting the match, game or performance should prepare in such a manner as to allow the event to take place almost under any circumstances. The proper way to accomplish this goal is to employ a system of advance preparation that analyzes the threats and develops a reasonable solution for every possible threat. There are no full-proof, 100% solutions, but a 100% effort is required during the planning stage, as well as during the implementation stage so that the risk of allowing terrorism to prevail is minimized. Canceling an event should be the very last resort, invoked only after it has become abundantly clear that despite the planning process, certain scenarios had not been provided with adequate solutions, and only then should the event be canceled. In any other scenario, other alternatives should be opted for, like enhancing security, expanding the security loops and even relocating the event to a different venue. The fight against terrorism is a long-distance run, and as such, it demands that we take calculated risks.

Brig. Gen. (res.) Nitzan Nuriel is the former head of Israel’s Counter-Terrorism Bureau.

Source: israeldefense.co.il

Streets of the future: Anti-terror bollards rolled out in Australian cities

UNSIGHTLY concrete blocks that line city streets and hot spots are fast becoming a familiar sight in major Australian cities as part of a move to stop terrorists from ploughing vehicles into pedestrians.

Concrete barricades are currently being installed in Sydney’s Martin Place, where the deadly Lindt Cafe siege took place, to prevent a London or Nice inspired terror attack.

A City of Sydney spokesman told news.com.au the council was currently installing concrete barricades in Martin Place, between Phillip and Elizabeth Streets, as part of ongoing work “to review and strengthen security in public places”.

“The City of Sydney takes advice from NSW Police and state emergency services on issues of public safety, including the installation of bollards and barricades to block vehicle access in response to security concerns,” the spokesman said.

Concrete bollards like these will be installed in Sydney’s Martin Place and other key location to stop London Bridge style terror attacks. Hamish Blair

Concrete bollards like these will be installed in Sydney’s Martin Place and other key location to stop London Bridge style terror attacks.

The introduction of the bollards is not response to any specific threat, according to the council.

“Barricades or bollards will be rolled out to other stages in Martin Place over the coming weeks after further consultation with NSW Police and emergency services,” the spokesperson said.

“The City is continuing to work with NSW Police on reviewing public places of mass gathering, on City of Sydney land, to determine if additional bollards or barricades are required.”

Anti-terror attack bollards are being placed in Martin Place, Sydney, where the Lindt Cafe siege took place in 2014. Picture: Justin Lloyd

Anti-terror attack bollards are being placed in Martin Place, Sydney, where the Lindt Cafe siege took place in 2014

There are currently over 2,500 bollards on City of Sydney controlled land but not all were introduced as anti terror measures. The cost for the supply and installation of a bollard can vary depending on the use between $1,000 and $5,000, according to the council.

A Property NSW spokesman told news.com.au it has also introduced anti-terror security measures “to restrict vehicle access at Darling Harbour and The Rocks, including enhanced security measures at three access points at Iron Wharf Place, Moriarty Walk and Zollner Circuit”.

“Under the NSW Counter Terrorism Plan, police support the owners and operators of critical infrastructure, providing guidance on appropriate risk based security measures to counter threats from terrorism,” the spokesman said.

“All security arrangements are made in consultation with NSW Police.”

It comes after Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull called for bollards to be placed in busy pedestrian areas nationwide following the deadly Bourke Street rampage in Melbourne earlier this year.

Some international security agencies and counter-terrorism experts have also recommended improving security following terror attacks by erecting concrete bollards.

It appears several state governments have heeded the advice as they rollout anti-terror measures designed to prevent a terror attack similar to those in London or Nice.

In England, armed soldiers now stand guard on the streets of London for the first time since 2003, guarding Buckingham Palace, Downing Street and Westminster. While there are no plans for armed guards to patrol city streets in Australia, one local who spoke to news.com.au, said it seemed like the “natural next step”.

A security expert told news.com.au that “bollards alone” will never been enough to prevent opportunistic terror attacks. But supporters of the initiatives say bollards, despite being visually unappealing, do offer tighter security in densely populated public areas.

Other Australian cities on their way to becoming what some critics have described as “fortresses” include Melbourne, Adelaide and the Gold Coast. And there are plans for many more to come.

MELBOURNE

Concrete Bollards have gone in overnight at Southern Cross station, Spencer street, Melbourne. Picture: Nicole Garmston

Concrete Bollards have gone in overnight at Southern Cross station, Spencer street, Melbourne.

Concrete Bollards have gone in overnight at Southern Cross station, Spencer street, Melbourne. Picture: Nicole Garmston

Concrete Bollards have gone in overnight at Southern Cross station, Spencer street, Melbourne.

Melburnians woke up to more than 100 new bollards lined outside public areas including Southern Cross station, Southbank Boulevard and other key locations this morning.

“At the request of the State Government and Victoria Police, the City of Melbourne has placed additional protective blocks at key pedestrian locations in the city,” a statement from a City of Melbourne spokesman read.

“Around 140 temporary concrete protective blocks have been placed at eight locations.

“The concrete barriers will provide greater security to people visiting and gathering in the city.”

But critics have labelled the measures “ugly” and expressed concern over potential impacts on livability quality and tourism.

Concrete Bollards have gone in overnight at Southern Cross station, Spencer street, Melbourne. Picture: Nicole Garmston

Concrete Bollards have gone in overnight at Southern Cross station, Spencer street, Melbourne.

One Melbourne resident, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, described the blocks as “eyesores”.

“It’s only one step away from armed guards with machine guns and night curfews for residents,” he told news.com.au.

“Safety is important but so is keeping the place attractive for locals and tourists to want to live and visit. There’s got to be a better way to do it.”

Concrete bollards on Flinders Street during the Anzac Day March in Melbourne, April 25, 2017. Picture: Mark Stewart

Concrete bollards on Flinders Street during the Anzac Day March in Melbourne, April 25, 2017.

Concrete Bollards have gone in overnight at Boathouse drive under Princes bridge Southbank, Melbourne. Picture: Nicole Garmston

Concrete Bollards have gone in overnight at Boathouse drive under Princes bridge Southbank, Melbourne.

The newest bollards at eight key Melbourne locations are in addition to 66 already installed on June 10 in the Bourke St Mall and at Federation Square.

The first ones were installed after the fatal Bourke Street rampage in which a car mowed through crowds in the mall, killing six people, including a 10-year-old girl, in January this year.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews said the terror attacks in Nice and France had inspired work around making Melbourne safer.

“There is a balance to be struck here in keeping the city functional and doing everything we can to make attacks, events, crimes, evil like what we saw (on Bourke St) much harder (to commit),” he said when announcing the initiative earlier this month.

“There’s no time to be wasted here. The threat of terror ‒ the threat of hostile vehicle attacks, the threats to public safety ‒ are all too real.

“We weren’t going to wait around for six months or 12 months while planter boxes are built so they look better.”

A pram is seen on the corner of Bourke and William Street after a man went on a rampage in a car through Bourke St mall, Melbourne, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. Picture: AAP /Julian Smith.

A pram is seen on the corner of Bourke and William Street after a man went on a rampage in a car through Bourke St mall, Melbourne, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017.

Police Minister Lisa Neville said the government had to act quickly and the current concrete blocks were only temporary.

“These are temporary, these are not what people will have to put up with forever,” she told radio station 3AW.

“This has been in response to international incidents and we just thought ‘we can’t wait’.

“It would be great if we didn’t need to have this, it does change the nature of our city a little bit.

Melbourne Lord Mayor Robert Doyle has previously said bollards have the potential to make a city look like a fortress.

“It’s not my preference to have ‘fortress Melbourne’,” Mr Doyle said last month.

Concrete Bollards Bourke street Mall Melbourne. Picture: Nicole Garmston

Concrete Bollards Bourke street Mall Melbourne.

Concrete Bollards have gone in overnight at Boathouse drive under Princes bridge Southbank, Melbourne. Picture: Nicole Garmston

Concrete Bollards have gone in overnight at Boathouse drive under Princes bridge Southbank, Melbourne.

Mr Doyle today told news.com.au that council was “moving towards permanent measures” after responding to requests from police with temporary protective blocks.

“We’ll look first at street furniture, planter boxes and rubbish bins, which can be reinforced and turned into unobtrusive but effective safety measures,” he said.

“Then we’ll look at versions of the green “heritage” style bollards that you can see near Flinders Street Station and towards Princes Bridge.

“After that, we’ll look at fixed bollards and retractable bollards. We’ll take advice from the police on their placement.

“I recently travelled to Chicago where they’ve used flower beds along the footpaths, surrounded by bluestone, as a form of bollard.

“What looks like a very attractive street treatment is in fact an effective safety measure. We’re looking at this approach.”

GOLD COAST

The bollards which will be installed in Surfers Paradise. Photo: Supplied

The bollards which will be installed in Surfers Paradise.

Sixteen anti-terrorist pop-up bollards on the Esplanade in Surfers Paradise will be all that stands in between an out-of-control vehicle and pedestrians.

The Gold Coast City Council is spending $500,000 to install the bollards across the Esplanade to help protect pedestrians from terrorists who use trucks and large vehicles to plough into pedestrians, the Gold Coast Bulletin reported.

Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate said the bollards were so strong they could stop a high speed truck and still retract and pop-up for the next event.

The retractable heavy-duty pillars will be put up during major events in Surfers Paradise and in emergency situations.

Police and council workers will control when the bollards are in use.

The bollards will be placed on the Esplanade by the end of the year.

ADELAIDE

Adelaide’s Rundle Mall has had permanent bollards in place to increase security since early this year.

“Places need to be safe and they also need to be seen to be safe. There’s a perception and reality thing we need to manage,” Lord Mayor Martin Haese told ABC radio in January.

Mr Haese said Rundle Mall is the city’s main retail area and a key public space.

The bollards are placed at either end of the mall and were designed to allow traders access in vehicles at different times.

Mr Haese said the council was continuing to work with the state government to ensure the safety of public events across the city.

“We recognise, quite unfortunately, that we’re probably operating in a somewhat different environment than what we were a few years ago,” he said.

“That’s a little bit sad in itself but it might be a reality.”

Source: News.com.au