Better Barriers Offer Better Security

AML Risk Management has exclusive access to the Meridian Group’s unique range of Crash Barriers.

Here we re-publish extracts from their website showing the equipment available, how and where it has been used, and it’s very real advantages in preparing for major events where ‘bump in, bump out’ equipment is required.

Meet the Archer 1200

img-2.jpg

Security is never a single product solution. Meridian Barriers fill a specific need that is simply unmatched by anything currently on the market. Strength and flexibility make them a vital component of your overall security plan. The Archer 1200 is the only solution that meets your needs.

The Archer 1200 is the only portable barrier solution to hold certifications in both the U.S. and European crash test standards.

Certified Results

The Archer 1200 has passed both the U.S. DOD and PAS 68 Crash Test with unanchored deployment on hard surfaces.

Rapid Deployment

Anyplace, anywhere. Our barriers provide unmatched stopping power with drop & stop convenience. No heavy equipment required. Portable design allows for quick response to changing threat levels or the need for emergency vehicle entry.

Lifetime Guarantee

Unlike fixed bollards, our barriers are non-lethal to the driver and minimize shrapnel spray. Maintenance free (requires no electricity or hydraulics), 100% Reusable and we offer a LIFETIME GUARANTEE.

img-1.jpg

Event Protection

Our products have been utilized in high profile public events like the Grammy Awards, sports venues, Ports of Long Beach, Shell Motiva Oil & Gas Refinery as well as military uses from Fort Wainwright, Alaska to Kandahar Air Force Base.

Accessories

Meridian Arrestor Cables™

arrester-cables

Meridian Arrestor Cables™ use technology from aircraft carriers to absorb the kinetic energy of a moving vehicle and pull the barriers into play for vehicle mitigation without loss of life. They are attached to barriers in 3 or 8-foot segments and can be up to 3-ply across a barrier span (3 cables strung between two barriers). The 8-foot cables are designed to be detached to allow emergency vehicle entry if required.

Archer™ Ballistic Shield

archer-ballistic-shield.jpg

A ballistically rated extension that provides additional security from ordinance and shrapnel. Attaches to the Archer 750 and Archer 1000 Barrier Systems. The two bolt connection interface allows the shield to be installed in minutes.

Archer™ Barrier Brace

barrier-brace

This component may be added to the Archer 750 and Archer 1000 to provide additional stopping power for trucks and heavy duty vehicles. The brace is quickly installed with one bolt.

Tow Bar

tow-bar

A reciprocal handled, levered towing tool with variable height adjustment and two point, rapid connection interface. The tow bar easy grip handles allows on or two person teams to easily position the barriers in place.

Barrier Jack

barrier-jack

A high strength steel lever that allows the Archer 500, 750 and 1000 barrier wheels to easily be engaged or disengaged.

Semi-pneumatic Wheels

semi-pneumatic-wheels

Rugged, all-terrain semi-pneumatic wheel replacements for the Archer 500, 750 and 1000 barriers.

Installation Components

Earth Anchors

earch-anchor

Meridian’s specialized helical pier earth anchors are easily installed with a small Bobcat, Easy Auger II or other common hydraulic equipment. The design of the anchors minimizes soil disturbance during the vibration-free installation. The anchors are self-screwing and install in any weather condition with no excavation or spoils to remove.

The Meridian Advantage

Meridian’s Archer™ 1000 and 1200 Barriers are perfect solutions for:

  • Event security
  • Site construction
  • CFATS compliance
  • Maintenance support for fixed systems
  • Highway and facility construction
  • Building and facility protection
  • Perimeters and entry ways that change on a regular basis
  • Locations without electric service
  • Extreme temperature and weather conditions
  • Locations without heavy equipment to install heavy or cumbersome temporary systems

Source: betterbarriers.com

Call AML Risk Management now on 03 9326 2244 or use our contact us page here to order the Meridian Portable Crash Barrier Systems.

Planning, Prevention, Protection

Advertisements

Crash Barriers Save Lives

Recently in Melbourne there have been two serious incidents involving vehicular homicide. The first, in January 2017, resulted in an appalling toll of dead and injured. The second in Flinders St on the 21st of December also resulted in multiple injuries and a death.

Such acts – in both cases perpetrated by drug affected mentally ill drivers – demonstrate the need for the City of Melbourne to upgrade its access mechanisms to areas used heavily by predominantly Pedestrian traffic. Hydraulic Bollards, Boom Gates and in the case of large event crowd gatherings, Portable Crash Barriers, must be considered, installed and operated here on in. Worldwide other cities have had such devices in use now for over 10 years.

Hydraulic Bollards can be raised and lowered using sensors. These will ensure non-authorised vehicles cannot enter restricted areas such as the Bourke St Mall. These are also suitable for major Pedestrian crossings. Alternatively Boom Gates, again sensor operated, can allow access to trams or emergency vehicles, with the use of approved sensors.

globoll_a

With major events AML thoroughly recommend the use of Portable Crash Barriers – see here

meridian-crash-barriers-3

With events like ‘White Night’, the ‘Chinese New Year’ and the range of Events staged throughout the year in the CBD and nearby, Crash Barriers deployed by one or two people make good sense in preventing such tragedies as experienced here, in Nice, London, New York and Berlin. Crash Barriers can stop a vehicle travelling at 50km/h completely.

Be prepared, plan and action sensible strategies as required. Much of Melbourne’s CBD Grid still operated on the same principles as were implemented in the 1960s. It’s time to update and save lines.

Aug15_057-bt

cropped-profile-pic.pngFor further information about Crash Barriers please call AML on 03-9326-2244 or leave your contact details here to be contacted by one of our staff.

Planning, Prevention, Protection with AML Risk Management

A Strategic Plan will prevent another Bourke St Rampage

 

The Bourke St rampage of Jan 2017 had its first anniversary this year. With the pain and loss still raw for the families of the victims, this was a time for remembrance and healing.’

Bourke St is Melbourne’s only retail ‘main street’ Mall. The Mall, located between Elizabeth and Swanston St is banned to vehicular traffic from 6am until midnight. It can however be easily breached as the Trams have access at all times.

AML have a good knowledge of the precinct through an associate who managed portable displays in the Mall for over 10 years. The Mall can easily be locked down with sensor operated bollards or boom gates for Trams and strategically deployed florals. For major events mobile crash barriers can be situated effectively to ensure minimal risk.

We pay our respects to the victims and their families and pray that such an event doesn’t occur again. Here is the report from the ABC on the memorial ceremony and those participating.

Bourke Street car attack anniversary marked at memorial service in Melbourne

9352588-3x2-700x467

Kurt and Emily Mudie paid tribute to their sister Jess, who died after the attack.

Family members of victims of the Bourke Street car attack have spoken of how they miss their loved ones and thanked the public for their care and support at a memorial service in Melbourne.

Six people were killed and many more injured when a car drove through the busy Bourke Street mall and along the footpath for several blocks on January 20, 2017.

Three-month-old Zachary Bryant, Thalia Hakin, 10, Matthew Si, 33, Yosuke Kanno, 25 and Jess Mudie, 22, were all killed after being hit along Bourke St.

Emily and Kurt Mudie delivered a tribute to their sister Jess, who was Emily’s twin.
“She was the most amazing person that I know, she would never ever fail to put a smile on my face, and I loved doing anything with her,” Ms Mudie said.

Ms Mudie said her sister would never leave her and continued to motivate her, as she had in life.

Mr Mudie said he had always tried to be there for his sister, but she had always been there for him.

The siblings sent love to their families and friends, to those who had been on Bourke Street on that day, and others who had lost loved ones.

“We know that this is a super-crap time, but I’m told time is a great healer and we will always be there for you if you ever need it,” Ms Mudie said.

8201806-3x2-340x227

Matthew Si, 33, was a loving husband and father, his wife Melinda Tan said.

The wife of Matthew Si, Melinda Tan, said she had been supported by many through the heartbreak of losing her husband.

“The pain of losing Matt will never disappear,” she said.

“His time with us was cut short, he was only 33 years old and he was always rushing home to our daughter Aria.

“That day he dropped her off at childcare and never came back. I’ve had to adjust to a new life that will always be missing a loving husband and father.”

Ms Tan said she was comforted that emergency crews did their best to save her husband and that he did not suffer alone.

Melbourne Symphony Orchestra’s Sophie Rowell performed a violin solo for Mr Si, who was himself an accomplished violinist.

Matthew Bryant, the father of three-month-old Zachary Bryant, fought back tears as he spoke about his son.

8205850-1x1-340x340

Zara (left) with her brother Zachary Bryant (right). Their father said he had looked at the two of them on Christmas morning in 2016 and thought life was perfect.

“Our connection with Zachy started long before he was born — we named him a couple of months into the pregnancy and couldn’t have been more excited to welcome that little man into our family.

“From the first time I held him, it was pure love.”

Mr Bryant said he would always be grateful and blessed to be Zachary’s father.
The couple had a third child, Zayne, last month, joining their older daughter Zara, who was with Zachary when he died.

“While he unfortunately will never have the chance to meet his older brother, we endeavour to always keep the memory of Zachy strong and alive,” Mr Bryant said.
Victorian Governor Linda Dessau honoured those who had been injured, the first responders and families who had lost loved ones.

9352612-3x2-700x467

The families of victims and Victoria’s leaders paid tribute to emergency service workers at the memorial.

“To show that we have not forgotten your loss, and to offer you whatever support and comfort that we can.”

She also paid tribute to civilians who helped on the day.

“Those who responded when they found themselves in the midst of something for which they could not possibly have been prepared … who did all they could do to humanly help and provided us with a much appreciated beacon of hope by their goodness.”

The accused driver, James Gargasoulas, 27, has pleaded not guilty to murder and attempted murder charges.

‘Tragedy will not define us’

Premier Daniel Andrews said Victorians had responded to “one act of evil with countless acts of empathy, compassion and, most importantly, love”.

“No words will ever be enough, nothing can ever undo the damage, but I hope that there is some small measure of comfort in knowing that you are not alone,” he said.

On Saturday, which was exactly one year since the incident, a private ceremony involving family and friends of those who died, as well as those who were injured, was held at the Parliament Gardens Reserve.

Two plaques were also unveiled — one in the pavement and one on a park chair.

“In memory of those whose lives were lost in Bourke Street on 20 January 2017 and in recognition of others who were injured or affected by this tragedy,” they read.

8206614-3x2-700x467

Flowers, toys and notes were left along Bourke Street in the days after the attack last year.

While some left flowers and notes at the reserve and also at different places along Bourke St, there was no official service on Saturday.

Source: abc.net.au