Hostile Vehicle Mitigation – Meridian Crash Barriers

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When a requirement arises for Temporary Crash Barriers, the Meridian Crash Barrier systems provide a sensible, efficient, portable mechanism to prevent hostile vehicle intrusions.

The Meridian system has been developed in the USA and used successfully in war-zones such as Afghanistan (Khandahar Airport), Oil and Fuel Refineries, Ports and other locations. It has been tested and confirmed to stop vehicles dead in their tracks travelling at 50km/h.

Here is the final excerpt from the Federal Government’s recommendations on Hostile Vehicle Mitigation – Temporary Barriers. This is precisely when the Meridian system as supplied by AML Risk Management comes into its own.

Re-deployable devices

Re-deployable devices are vehicle security barriers that are kept in storage and can be utilised when there is an increase in the level of threat to a specific location or crowded places generally. These devices are designed solely as protection measures and are generally not customisable.

Meridian Rapid Defense Group           Anti-Vehicle Barriers

There are two significant drawbacks associated with re-deployable HVM devices. The primary disadvantage is the fact that they are intelligence-driven, meaning that they are only effective if the site owner is aware of the threat: they cannot mitigate against a ‘no notice’ attack. A second disadvantage is their utilitarian appearance and consequent inability to respond to the aesthetic requirements of the surrounding environment, although their appearance is less of a concern if they are only operational for short periods of time, as is usually the case.

These drawbacks illustrate the importance of ensuring that permanent fixtures form part of a HVM strategy.

Rapid vehicle deployment barrier

  • Temporary installation
  • No assembly tools required
  • Set up in less than 10 minutes
  • As with permanent barriers, re-deployable barriers should be treated and rated against a recognised standard to resist the impact of the threat vehicle.

Portable barrier-in-a-box

  • Impact tested: 7.5 tonne at 48km/h
  • Temporary or permanent installation
  • Set up in 7 minutes
  • As this barrier is installed to bollards, the distance between them and their impact rating should meet the manufacturer’s specifications

Rapid deployable surface mount

  • Impact tested: 7.5 tonne at 48km/h
  • Short to mid-term installation
  • Deployed at a rate of 1 bollard every 5 minutes

Re-deployable road safety barriers

Road safety barriers such as concrete, steel and plastic water filled jersey barriers are designed to deflect vehicles from leaving the roadway or trafficable lane. These barriers are generally surface mounted and suitable for use as re-deployable traffic calming devices.

Caution must be taken not to use jersey barriers outside of their design specifications.

Improvised vehicle barriers

Vehicles have and continue to be used as improvised vehicle barriers around the world. This type of barrier is an attractive option due to its portability to close accessible gaps on roadways or paths that could be exploited by hostile vehicle attack, or to act as a gate to regulate authorised vehicle entry into a protected zone.

If using vehicles to form part of a barrier system, a comprehensive vehicle dynamics assessment must be conducted to determine suitability. The assessment must consider the size, weight and placement of the barrier vehicle relative to the size, weight and speed of the foreseeable threat (attack vehicle).

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2.02 Every Metre Counts

Achieving a factor of safety

Where possible, barring vehicular access entirely – thus automatically removing threats to the site – is preferable to more elaborate vehicle management designs. This option can also have added operational benefits and reduced risk of accidents or misuse.

In selecting this method, however, consideration should be given to routine and emergency servicing requirements of the asset, as well as surrounding traffic and transport imperatives. The exclusion of traffic from a wide area may increase traffic volumes and congestion in the surrounding local transport network, thus creating a need for wider traffic management plans.

It is important to design barrier systems, both permanent and temporary that clearly define vehicle and pedestrian spaces. Street furniture in accordance with international standards can be used as mitigation, however they should be supplemented with additional traffic calming measures.

Permanent and temporary barrier systems that are not supported with these additional measures as depicted in the photograph(s) only serve to increase the risk to pedestrians in or on the barriers in the event of a vehicle impact.

With all surface mounted barriers, your assessment must also include the predicted penetration distance the barrier and attack vehicle will travel post impact. This distance will inform the factor of safety that is required (space between the barrier line and crowds).

2.03 Vehicle Approaches and Traffic Management Options

Impact angle is measured between the direction of travel of the vehicle and the impact location (between 0-90 degrees).

Owners and operators should consider a variety of traffic management options, including different forms of vehicle approaches.

Even a small reduction in the velocity of a hostile vehicle will have a significant decrease in the amount of energy that vehicle is carrying, thus reducing its impact and permitting less intrusive HVM devices, which may reduce costs.

High speed = high impact = catastrophic result.

A small decrease in speed = a large decrease in energy = reduced impact = less intrusive barriers and possible reduced cost.

There are a variety of traffic management options to help reduce vehicle speed.

Most severe – Head on impact

This impact mode is usually the most severe. The vehicle is fully engaged and the resultant momentum generated by the mass and speed of the vehicle is directed towards the point of impact.

Less severe – Angled impact

This impact mode is less severe than a head-on approach. The angle typically leads to speed loss by redirection of the vehicle.

Least severe – ‘In-turn’ impact

This mode is the least severe.

Lateral acceleration forces inhibit the capability of a vehicle to maintain or increase speed during a turn in.

Longitudinal deflections

Horizontal deflections, such as bends or chicanes, are often employed in urban or residential areas to encourage drivers to slow down. Drivers reduce vehicle speed in order to maintain ride comfort while making the required direction change; this, in turn, results in improved road user safety.

Longitudinal deflections can also be used to limit the maximum speed of a vehicle operated by a determined driver.

Well-designed temporary chicanes can help to slow vehicles in the lead up to a special event area.

Remember: always use barriers within their design specification.

Vertical deflections

Vertical deflections such as road humps, speed cushions and rumble strips are often employed as a visual deterrent and to disrupt ride comfort, encouraging road users to reduce speed. These,
however, typically provide negligible deterrent or speed reduction against a determined hostile vehicle attack.

Inclines

Gradient will affect the ability of a hostile vehicle to maintain speed or accelerate toward an asset, especially for larger, heavier vehicles. Steep inclines may also be used to restrict the line of sight along a potential attack route, thus introducing an element of uncertainty to the attacker.

Use of inclines will require a large amount of physical space so may not be an option unless there is natural incline available in the surrounding topography.

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Conclusion

Smart design

The nature and use of hostile vehicles has evolved in recent years with terrorism and criminal activity, so too has our understanding and response. This evolution is reflected in the design
and implementation of new and innovative physical protective security measures that help prevent and reduce the consequences of an attack.

No longer must we equate effective physical protective security with cold, sterile measures of austerity. Creative innovation is paving the way for seamlessly integrated protection measures that complement and enhance current needs and desires within public and private spaces.

Equally, common sense needs to be applied to the installation of HVM measures by clearly identifying and prioritising the areas that need protection, rather than areas where it is ordinarily
impossible for vehicles to gain access.

It is important not to over-engineer HVM.

Innovative approach = optimised integration By recognising and acknowledging risks during the design stages of a building or public space, it is possible to achieve an optimal, holistic approach to safety through security. This is also the most cost-effective time to implement physical security measures. The MacLeamy Curve below outlines the importance of early considerations.

Where to go next

Not all of the options provided in this document will be applicable or achievable at all sites. A specific and unique site assessment will need to be conducted to establish the most suitable device for each site even if an owner/ operator has multiple similar assets. The surrounding environment will not be the same in each instance and these differences, no matter how subtle, will impact on the nature of the HVM solutions required.

Source: nationalsecurity.gov.au

Call now on 03 9326 2244 or leave your contact details here  for a free, no obligation consultation on providing real protection for your next street event, sporting event or outdoor program.

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Hostile Vehicle Mitigation with AML – Portable Crash Barriers by Meridian do the job.

When events are planned with large crowds in space accessible by vehicles, the thinking behind planning for such events now has to change. In a city where many facilities were designed in times where the population was set at 1–2 million we are now confronted with a wider Greater Melbourne population base of over 5 million, including nearby provincial cities such as Geelong and the Mornington Peninsular. The simple fact is that within such a population base there will be those that are seriously unbalanced or unhinged mentally as has been demonstrated with both the Bourke St rampage and the Flinders St incident.

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It’s time in many instances to provide permanent Hostile Vehicle Mitigation systems to protect areas such as Transport Hubs, Pedestrian Malls and Sporting Facilities.

But in other instances, such as Street Festivals, outdoor markets and peaceful demonstrations, it is now necessary to provide portable units that can be installed quickly, cost effectively and removed upon the event or function finishing.

AML Risk Management now operate and provide the Meridian Crash Barrier systems as a truly effective Hostile Vehicle Mitigation protective management system. For further information on the Meridian Crash Barriers please click here. The systems have been used at the South Melbourne Market in inner Melbourne and will be used on Anzac Day to protect marchers.

The Meridian Crash Barrier system will stop a hostile vehicle completely even up to 50km/h!

The Federal Government has developed a security strategy to prevent such vehicular attacks and we continue our reprints on the working paper created.

Vehicle Security Barriers (VSBs)

VSBs can be passive (static) or active (functioning/ mechanical) in their operation. Active devices are susceptible to mechanical failures and human error/ deception techniques, and require maintenance and ongoing costs; accordingly, passive barriers are preferred when there is no operational requirement to provide vehicle access into an area.

When selecting a barrier the foundation and installation is just as important to consider as the barrier itself. Poorly designed foundations can compromise the performance of a barrier in resisting high-energy hostile vehicle impacts.

Manufacturers offering an impact-tested VSB should also be able to offer a tested and approved foundation design for that product. Other considerations when installing a VSB include:

  • The presence of underground obstructions
  • Ground conditions
  • The perceived calculated impact loading
  • Protection to underground services in close proximity
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Foundation requirements

Passive barriers

There are a great number of options for creating effective passive barriers around an asset. They need not be costly to install and can easily fulfil aesthetic requirements of the space and its patrons, as well as the requirements of HVM.

A balance should be struck between proportionate security measures, the needs of the local businesses and functionality of public space. It is possible to integrate bespoke HVM measures into most public realm features.

Urban elements that can be used include:

  • Landscape features (e.g. sculpted or clad earthworks, steep verges)
  • Shrouded bollards (i.e. designed to match local architecture)
  • Decorative, structural or energy absorbing planters (i.e. more aesthetically acceptable)
  • Strengthened ‘light’ structures (e.g. bus or smoking shelter, information sign)
  • Large immovable landmarks (e.g. statues, walls)
  • Integrated street furniture (e.g. lighting column, traffic signal, seating, cycle rack)
  • Level changes (e.g. steps, high kerbs)
  • Water features (e.g. fountain, pond or pool)

Defining vehicle and pedestrian spaces

Designing and protecting pedestrian-only areas around assets is essential not only to protect pedestrians who would ordinarily use the space, but has the added benefit of restricting vehicle access to the buildings, creating standoff and natural barriers.

The best way to protect pedestrians is to create clearly defined pathways separate from vehicles. This can be achieved through the use of barriers along the edge of footpaths or by integrating walkways into new developments that limit vehicle accessibility but maintain easy access for pedestrians ensuring their safety. Designs like these may also help reduce the opportunity for accidental collisions between pedestrians and cars, which are quite common in carparks.

There are various designs that can help to define and reinforce pedestrian areas but should not be relied upon as the sole source of protection. These can include:

  • Raised footpath
  • Cobbles near gutter
  • Lights on the ground (car parks)
  • Verge; and
  • Medium strip

Stairs will stop most but not all vehicles and can be used to add a level of protection to high-pedestrian areas or gathering points. Their main use is in mitigating out of control vehicles, or slowing down determined vehicles; they may also act as a visual deterrent (target hardening). However, they should not be solely relied upon to protect critical infrastructure, since some vehicles (short wheel base and high front end) can easily mount stairs.

The images to the left show Civic Pavilion precinct in Sydney which incorporates a combination of stairs, a sculptured garden structure, and bollards to separate the pedestrian space from vehicles.

Access for emergency and maintenance vehicles into the space is managed through the use of removable bollards.

The venue provides a good example of how effective but subtle vehicle mitigation options can be integrated into the design, establishing a pedestrian environment safe from the risk of hostile vehicles.

Separating vehicle and pedestrian spaces can be achieved by strategically placing vehicle security barriers to define those spaces. Installing metal bollards on the edge of the roadway, in the image below, provides protection for pedestrians against a vehicle attack.

The large pedestrian space between the building and roadway creates additional stand-off distance that significantly reduces the building’s vulnerability to a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device (VBIED).

The option of seating as a mitigation device at this location would not be appropriate, since the absence of a raised gutter between the roadway and pedestrian pavement increases the risk of injury to pedestrians in the event of a vehicle impact.

In designing pedestrian only spaces, consideration must be given to the volume of people (including wheelchairs and prams) movement in and out of a venue, together with access to the space by emergency and maintenance vehicles. This coupled with a comprehensive vehicle dynamics assessment should influence the shape and style of appropriate vehicle security barriers.

Hostile vehicle guidelines for crowded places

Semi structural

Hostile vehicle guidelines for crowded places

Sculpture and street

Hostile vehicle guidelines for crowded places

Riverside upgrade: sculptured feature

Hostile vehicle guidelines for crowded places

Riverside upgrade: sculptured feature

Hostile vehicle guidelines for crowded places

Water feature

Hostile vehicle guidelines for crowded places

Suitable space for passive barriers

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Steps on a pedestrian street

Hostile vehicle guidelines for crowded places

Remember

  • For effective barrier placement the maximum clearance between two barriers should be no wider than 1200mm
  • The barriers should also have a minimum height of 500mm

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There may be naturally formed barriers located around a site that could be used as part of a secure perimeter. Natural barriers could include rivers, ponds, lakes, densely wooded areas, steep slopes or changes in ground level that will either divert attack or preclude vehicle passage.

Where these features do not naturally occur it may be feasible to engineer them. In these cases, consideration must be given to access and egress paths for pedestrians and general crowd management around the venue or asset.

The recommended solutions are to construct a ditch, bund or combination of the two. Considerations such as cost (and long-term cost benefit), availability of materials/production facilities, ground conditions and architectural advantage will influence the choice of options.

Trees and fences

Trees

The use of individual trees as a VSB is not generally recommended. This is because full-scale impact testing of trees has indicated that trees do not necessarily perform well against a determined hostile vehicle impact.

Where an existing tree cannot be moved and forms part of the physical perimeter, a number of factors should be considered:

  • Tree health
  • Stability of local ground conditions around the tree roots
  • Trimming of branches to remove climbing aids (e.g. over a perimeter fence); and
  • Lines of sight for guard-forces and CCTV surveillance.

Where areas of bush, forest or other densely packed trees are present to form a natural barrier, the combined resistance will likely be more effective against determined vehicular impact. In this instance, any gaps between trees may only require lower grade infill HVM measures to prevent a slow speed encroachment attack.

Fences

Most conventional fences are not a viable option for a HVM measure; they are easily breached by vehicles at low speeds and should only be used where vehicle speed is restricted by terrain or
approach. Fences are better suited to assist perimeter monitoring by installing perimeter intruder detection systems (PIDS) like motion sensors on the fences.

Active barriers

If vehicle access to the asset is required, then active barriers can be used to identify and monitor vehicles allowed past the standoff perimeter.

Use of an active VSB is required for control of vehicle access. The term “active” refers to the system’s ability to operate from closed (secure) to open, and could take a number of forms, such as:

  • Retractable bollard;
  • Retractable blocker; and
  • Folding, sliding, swinging, rising-arm gate.
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Retractable bollard

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Retractable bollard and rising-arm gate

An active VSB can be manually operated by a person or powered (e.g. hydraulic power source). A VSB should be selected not only on the basis of performance or operational requirements, but also
cost. Careful consideration should be made by the consultant and purchaser as to the full cost of a VSB, especially post-installation costs and long-term requirements such as:

  • Training;
  • Service requirements;
  • Maintenance and repairs;
  • Spare parts;
  • Environment e.g. salt corrosion;
  • Positioning of controls e.g. ensure they are secure; and not accessible by the public;
  • Drainage issues.

If an active VSB is required then a well-designed vehicle access control point should ensure that guards are not put under undue pressure or distracted by traffic management requirements that
might prevent their being able to carry out security procedures safely and securely.

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Vehicle access control point

The ideal VACP deploys two rows of VSB at the end of a VSB enforced chicane. One row at the start and another at the end of a VSB enforced chicane as per diagram. This creates a contained secure zone that a vehicle cannot enter or leave until authorised by the guard forces or an automatic access control system. This type of VACP uses up a lot of land space and is expensive to install and maintain; thus, while ideal, this type of VACP is only suitable to certain areas.

Imperative to control points are rejection lanes, search bays or parking facilities that have not been illustrated in this diagram.

Standards for vehicle security barriers

International Standards Organisation (ISO), International Workshop Agreement (IWA) 14-1 & 14-2. 2013.

Part 1 relates to the performance requirement, impact test method and performance rating.

IWA 14 -2 :2013

Part 2 relates to the application of vehicle security barriers.

The selection and installation of vehicle security barriers must include consideration of relevant legislation and general crowd management. For example; public access and safety, accessibility for wheelchairs and prams.

Source: nationalsecurity.gov.au

AML Risk Management can provide both the planning, expertise and installation of the Meridian Crash Barrier system as is required, as well as timely removal upon completion of any event.

Remember AML Risk Management for Planning, Prevention and Protection. It’s the right choice.

Barriers to prevent hostile vehicles to be used at Anzac Day marches this year.

Hostile vehicle mitigation is the term used by Government agencies and the security industry to ensure the safety of large crowds and pedestrian masses. Melbourne has endured 3 such incidents in the last two years with fatalities occurring on two occasions. It is important to understand that the perpetrators in all three incidents were deemed mentally unstable. These were not terrorist inspired actions, although such tragedies as the Nice and Berlin Truck rampages no doubt encourage a range of ‘me too’ lunacy.

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AML Risk Management is at the forefront in the provision of portable, effective crash barriers to provide Hostile Vehicle Mitigation in public places, as was recently noted in Melbourne’s Herald Sun Newspaper

Tougher barriers for March

Super-strength steel barriers will be installed to shield crowds at Anzac Day marches this year to prevent deadly attacks and rampages.

The barriers – which are so strong they meet the standards of the US defence force and Homeland Security – are already being used at the South Melbourne Market. It is the first time the technology has been used in Australia.

The three Archer 1200 barriers are designed to protect high traffic and pedestrian areas from dangerous and threatening vehicles and can stop a vehicle travelling at 50km/h. They can also be used in the event of changing threat levels.

AML Risk Management will install the barriers at Anzac Day marches and other major events in Melbourne this year.

Managing Director Andrew Duffy said the company has several bookings in 2018.

“We plan to continue implementing vehicle mitigation strategies, and increasing the safety and security of events in Melbourne” he said.

“The feedback we have received has been excellent. Comments were made by members of the public claiming they were pleased to see action being taken against hostile vehicles.”

South Melbourne Market manager Ian Sumpter said the barriers were among key safety measures that form part of the market’s risk management strategy.

Source: Herald Sun

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For further information and recommendations from the Federal Government’s National Security operation, please read section 2 here of its media release on the subject.

How to separate hostile traffic from pedestrians –

Hot spots such as outdoor markets, parades, festivals and sporting events In designing and applying measures to mitigate hostile vehicle risks in public spaces, it is important
to consider equally the needs of the normal users of the space. Spaces must be safe but they must also be functional, such that the level of security is proportionate to the level of risk.

As such, a ‘one size fits all’ approach is not effective: mitigation solutions must be tailored to the physical and practical context. Additionally, since threat levels and terrorist methods evolve over time (often in response to security methods), both current and future security needs must be taken into account and security measures reviewed periodically for effectiveness.

For most existing locations and in some new build designs, there are issues that should be considered to maximise both the functionality of the space and effectiveness of the HVM measures, such as:

  • Business needs (e.g. budget, health and safety);
  • Logistics (e.g. traffic management, operational requirements);
  • Pedestrian and traffic throughput;
  • Disability legislation; and
  • Building (e.g. appearance, planning consent)

In this case a risk management plan, including a vulnerability assessment, should be conducted to understand what impact the functional needs of the space has on the proposed HVM measures.

Crowded places – Outdoor special events

It is important to take a holistic approach to the security of an outdoor special event where large crowds are expected. Your initial assessment must consider all foreseeable threats which should inform your decision in selecting an appropriate venue.

For vehicle risks, and where possible, it’s considered good business practice to select a venue that contains existing natural barriers, e.g. large bolders, well established dense trees lines, natural berms, ditches, running rivers or creeks. This will reduce the amount and ultimately the cost of hiring re-deployable vehicle barriers.

Remember to consider other risks when installing security measures so not to introduce vulnerabilities to other risks.

Safe places by design

The strategic integration of steps, columns and sculptures into the building’s design offers a good example of how hostile vehicle mitigation can be applied in a subtle way. A flight of steps leading into a building can restrict access to most conventional vehicles, presenting the building as a less desirable target.

Strategically placed mitigation devices such as spheres, planter boxes, seats, or bollards on the pavement surrounding the entrance of the building provides additional protection against unauthorised vehicle intrusion while increasing the standoff distance. It is important to ensure that barrier solutions that may not be purpose built (e.g. planter boxes, sculptures) are properly mounted and reinforced against impact. This may require advice from a qualified engineer with experience in HVM.

To be continued next week

Source: nationalsecurity.gov.au

AML provide planning, prevention and protection with the exclusive use of the Meridian Crash Barrier systems. Deployed, the systems will stop a vehicle travelling at 50km/h completely.

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AML – real security, real protection, through planning and prevention.

Hostile Vehicle Mitigation – The Real Issue is Protection

The Australian Government has created guidelines for organisations, Councils and other entities with a vested interest in preventing Hostile Vehicle Attacks. AML Risk Management is a forerunner in presenting Hostile Vehicle Mitigation practices. It utilises the Meridian Crash Barrier systems and has provided fast turnaround deployment and installation in key locations to date.

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The Federal Government through its National Security website provides the following analysis. This week we publish Section 1 so that people may aquire a better more fulsome understanding of the risks involved.

Key hot spots

Commercial hubs, shopping centres, special events, stadiums, hotels, CBDs

About this publication – When and where vehicles collide with pedestrians

Protecting people in crowded places requires attention to the vehicle management, urban design and architectural features of a space. This document addresses the ways in which vehicles are being used as weapons to harm people in public spaces, and how these threats can be mitigated.

Section 1 defines hostile vehicles and the nature of the threats they may pose to people in crowded places.

Section 2 provides guidelines on how to prevent hostile vehicles from injuring people. It provides examples of physical barriers and traffic management solutions to prevent hostile vehicles entering crowded places.

The Conclusion outlines the advantages of early implementation in relation to cost and overall protection when designing an effective mitigation strategy, and provides contact details for further information.

1.01 Threat Context

What is the threat context?

The use of a vehicle as a weapon in a terrorist attack is not new. For some time, this tactic has been considered and used by violent extremists – including in Western countries.

Recent terrorist incidents and violent extremist propaganda demonstrate that hostile vehicle attacks continue to be of interest to violent extremists globally.

Attacks of this nature require minimal capability, but can have a devastating impact if targeted towards crowded places.

The terrorist attack on the Bastille Day parade in Nice in July 2016 and subsequent vehicle attacks in Germany and the United Kingdom have attracted global attention. Terrorist propaganda has glorified these attacks, including the methods and tactics used, and called for emulation around the
world.

The potential for hostile vehicle attacks is not limited to Islamist extremists – any violence-prone group or individual could use a vehicle as a weapon should it suit their objectives.

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1.02 Hostile Vehicles

What is a hostile vehicle?

A hostile vehicle is generally one whose driver is determined to access a restricted or unauthorised area or location in order to cause injury/death to people, disrupt business or effect publicity for a cause. A hostile vehicle may be used to carry an explosive device or the vehicle itself, travelling at speed, may present the primary danger.

The most likely targets of hostile vehicles are spaces occupied by a critical mass of people at a particular time, where the aim of an attack is to cause death/injury to large numbers of people.

The driver of a hostile vehicle may not necessarily obey traffic road rules. There is an inherent danger in not taking this into account when conducting a site assessment. All too often, security measures have been installed under the assumption that a vehicle will not, for example, travel the wrong way down a one-way street.

This document focuses on preventing vehicular access to crowded places to help mitigate the risk of a terrorist attack. The suggested counter-measures may also be valuable in other situations, such as protecting pedestrians on footpaths from dangerous or drunk drivers.

The methods of hostile vehicle attack may include:

  • Parked (containing material to cause harm ie explosives)
  • Encroachment;oExploiting gaps in site defences (no impact)
    – Tailgating through an active barrier system; and
    – Tampering with vehicle barriers to later provide unlawful access.
  • Penetrative Impact (ramming people & structures)
  • Entry by deception to access restricted areas (trojan vehicle)
  • Duress (against a security guard or employee to open a barrier)

1.03 Hostile Vehicle Mitigation

What is a crowded place?

Crowded places are locations or environments which are easily accessible by large numbers of people on a predictable basis. Crowded places include, but are not limited to, sports stadia, transport hubs, shopping centres, hotels, clubs, places of worship, tourist attractions, movie theatres, and civic spaces. Crowded places do not have to be buildings and can include open spaces such as parks and pedestrian malls. A crowded place will not necessarily be crowded at all times: crowd densities may vary between day and night, by season, and may be temporary, as in the case
of sporting events, open air festivals, or one-off events.

Security should be proportionate to threat

Security measures can be resource intensive, costly and, if not correctly managed and communicated, can alienate staff and the public and significantly disrupt the day -to-day operations of a crowded place. This is why expert specialist advice is essential and why careful consideration and planning is required before implementing any protective security measures.

It is important to take a holistic approach to security consistent with the foreseeable risks to your venue or asset. Applying security measures to counter the vehicle risk in isolation can inadvertently create a vulnerability to another risk, such as crowd crush.

Understanding the hostile vehicle risk is crucial to ensure your security measures are not over or under engineered.

Source: https://www.nationalsecurity.gov.au/Media-and-publications/Publications/Documents/hostile-vehicle-guidelines-crowded-places.pdf

Next week we will republish Section 2: ‘How to separate hostile vehicles from Pedestrians – Hot Spots’, such as Outdoor Markets, Parades, Festivals and Sporting Events.

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We will then discuss the deployment of the Meridian Crash Barriers and just how effective these units really are

Til next week remember Planning, Prevention and Protection.

Be safe, be sure with AML Risk Management.

Crash Barriers installed as South Melbourne Public Event

Last weekend saw the South Melbourne Market celebrate its annual ‘Mussels and Jazz Festival’. The event sees Cecil St closed to traffic and a range of food stalls operate around a central music stage. The street is closed between Coventry and York St and the event attracts large crowds over the weekend. Hostile Vehicle Mitigation Crash Barriers were installed for the event this year by AML Risk Management.

The Crash Barriers can effectively stop a vehicle travelling at 50km/h completely. As can be seen it is a simple deployment, requiring minimal labour. The barriers are not intrusive and for most people they are hardly noticed.

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The location provided a need for such equipment in that Cecil St in either direction would provide an unimpeded access for a hostile vehicle. The roundabouts could still be negotiated leaving hundreds of people vulnerable.

As can be seen the units are linked and provide a clear barrier to hostile vehicles. The Meridian System as installed by AML Risk Management can be viewed here.

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No doubt at future street events and public gatherings the positioning of such crash barriers will become the norm. It is interesting to note that the 15 year old driver who terrorised Swanston St on Grand Final Day faced court this week. Described as a mute and deaf teen, the court was told the teenager suffered from severe autism and had the language skills of a 3-5 year old child. He would have had no comprehension of the impact of his actions and as such escaped jail.

Put simply had he hit a pedestrian he would most certainly have maimed or killed them. Whether he was a terrorist or not (he most definitely wasn’t), his actions put many people at serious risk. Crash Barriers (Hostile Vehicle Mitigation Systems) ensure the safety of the public at large gatherings. They simply work.

For further information please call AML Risk Management on 03 9326 2244 during business hours, or leave your details here and our staff will provide you with further information.

With AML it’s Planning that provides Prevention and Protection.

Genuine Prevention Real Protection.

Hostile Vehicle Mitigation – What does it mean?

In June last year the Melbourne Cricket Ground sought expressions of interest in expanding its Protective Security Solutions at the MCG with a hostile vehicle solution.

Here is the report from SEN (Security Electronics and Networks) that sets out the facility’s requirements. The tenders closed in July 2017, but with no real tangible decision made for this year’s cricket season.

MELBOURNE Cricket Ground (MCG) is seeking expressions of interest for the expansion of the MCG Protective Security Solution at the MCG with a hostile vehicle mitigation solution.

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The MCC is seeking providers who have a validated track record in the design and installation of hostile vehicle mitigation solutions at similar sporting venues, or at other locations where direct comparisons can be made with the requirements of the MCC.

The MCG is Australia’s most attended sports and entertainment stadium, accommodating major events such as international cricket, Australian Rules football, soccer, rugby and concerts, as well as hosting a large number of major functions in the surrounding purpose-built facilities.

The MCG is on Crown Land in Yarra Park, Jolimont and is held on behalf of the people of Victoria by the MCG Trust. Day to day management and control of the stadium is delegated by the Trust to the Melbourne Cricket Club (the Club), which holds a long-term lease of the MCG.

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MCG seeking protection for pedestrian precinct

The 100,024-seat Melbourne Cricket Ground, is the 10th largest and one of the greatest sports arenas in the world. It is Australia’s largest stadium, the largest stadium in the Southern Hemisphere, the largest cricket ground by capacity in the world, and has the tallest light towers of any sporting venue in the world.

The MCG is within walking distance of the city centre and is served by the Richmond railway station, Richmond, and the Jolimont railway station, East Melbourne

The tender for hostile vehicle mitigation closed on July 20, 2017.

Source: securityelectronicsandnetworks.com

AML Risk Management offer a range of Hostile Vehicle Mitigation equipment including a range of Meridian Crash Barriers and Accessories. Click here to view.

Contact AML Risk Management on 03 9326 2244 for further information or leave contact details here for a callback.

AML Risk Management – Planning, Prevention and Protection

 

Crash Barriers – AFL Grand Final Day – Where were they?

In this incident a 15 year old, deaf and dumb male drives a stolen car (from a family member) up and down Swanston St in a highly erratic fashion. He appeared in the Children’s Court on January 3rd 2018 charged with with multiple offences. It was contended that the boy suffered from a range of mental illnesses and was an ardent collector of Military material on his computer. Mad or Bad? The police have to make this snap decision. Once out of the car, the boy’s stature gave it away and the police acted accordingly.

AFL Grand Final day car rampage caught on camera

WHEN a driver went on a speeding rampage in Melbourne, one pedestrian took matters into his own hands with the only item he had.

HORRIFYING CCTV footage shows a teenager’s alleged rampage through Melbourne’s CBD on AFL Grand Final day.
The footage, obtained by the Herald Sun, shows alarmed pedestrians and cyclists diving out of the way of the oncoming stolen car — which was also clocked doing skids in front of Flinders Street Station and running red lights shortly before 8am on September 30.
It comes to a bizarre climax as the alleged 15-year-old driver is approached by a pedestrian carrying an oBike — who throws the bicycle under the rear of the car.
The have-a-go hero then uses his elbow to smash the stolen car’s window and the driver steps out to confront him.

Victoria Police charged a 15-year-old Knoxfield boy with two counts of attempted murder, six counts of reckless conduct endangering life, and assaulting and resisting a police officer.

The force also allege the driver, who was wearing a helmet and dressed in camouflage gear, was armed with a knife.

However, the teenager was granted bail by a Children’s Court yesterday — prompting Victoria’s youth affairs minister to defend the state’s juvenile bail laws.

“We have made very significant reforms to the bail system. Of course, decisions are made by the judiciary in relation to particular individuals,” Youth Affairs Minister Jenny Mikakos told reporters.

Previous footage of the incident shows officers approaching the teenager and tasering him at the intersection of Flinders and Swanston streets, while others kicked away his weapon.

Bystanders were heard yelling: “Shoot him, shoot him.”

No one was injured in the rampage. One witness told the Herald Sun: “He was trying to get on the footpath and then started trying to hit people … He tried to run into Fed Square.”

Victoria Police said the incident was not related to terrorism — saying it is related to mental illness.

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A pedestrian carrying an oBike confronts the driver

The drama came on a day when the Victorian capital was packed with fans attending the AFL grand final at the MCG and amid increasing terrorism fears.

Early last year, six people were killed in nearby Bourke St during a horrific rampage when Dimitrious Gargasoulas, 26, allegedly drove his car through crowds of people. He has been charged with six counts of murder and 28 counts of attempted murder over the January 20 incident.

Source: news.com.au

Mobile Crash Barriers like these would ensure this type of insanity does not put pedestrians or for the main other vehicles in danger.

Think prevention, think protection, think planning. For major events it’s time to consider highly mobile portable crash barriers. In reality it makes no difference as to whether a militant or simply a mentally challenged person is driving the car. The protection of innocent life is in fact the objective.

For more information on Meridian Crash Barriers please call AML Risk Management on 03 9326 2244 or leave your contact details here.

AML – Where planning provides prevention and ultimately protection.

 

 

Better Barriers Offer Better Security

AML Risk Management has exclusive access to the Meridian Group’s unique range of Crash Barriers.

Here we re-publish extracts from their website showing the equipment available, how and where it has been used, and it’s very real advantages in preparing for major events where ‘bump in, bump out’ equipment is required.

Meet the Archer 1200

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Security is never a single product solution. Meridian Barriers fill a specific need that is simply unmatched by anything currently on the market. Strength and flexibility make them a vital component of your overall security plan. The Archer 1200 is the only solution that meets your needs.

The Archer 1200 is the only portable barrier solution to hold certifications in both the U.S. and European crash test standards.

Certified Results

The Archer 1200 has passed both the U.S. DOD and PAS 68 Crash Test with unanchored deployment on hard surfaces.

Rapid Deployment

Anyplace, anywhere. Our barriers provide unmatched stopping power with drop & stop convenience. No heavy equipment required. Portable design allows for quick response to changing threat levels or the need for emergency vehicle entry.

Lifetime Guarantee

Unlike fixed bollards, our barriers are non-lethal to the driver and minimize shrapnel spray. Maintenance free (requires no electricity or hydraulics), 100% Reusable and we offer a LIFETIME GUARANTEE.

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Event Protection

Our products have been utilized in high profile public events like the Grammy Awards, sports venues, Ports of Long Beach, Shell Motiva Oil & Gas Refinery as well as military uses from Fort Wainwright, Alaska to Kandahar Air Force Base.

Accessories

Meridian Arrestor Cables™

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Meridian Arrestor Cables™ use technology from aircraft carriers to absorb the kinetic energy of a moving vehicle and pull the barriers into play for vehicle mitigation without loss of life. They are attached to barriers in 3 or 8-foot segments and can be up to 3-ply across a barrier span (3 cables strung between two barriers). The 8-foot cables are designed to be detached to allow emergency vehicle entry if required.

Archer™ Ballistic Shield

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A ballistically rated extension that provides additional security from ordinance and shrapnel. Attaches to the Archer 750 and Archer 1000 Barrier Systems. The two bolt connection interface allows the shield to be installed in minutes.

Archer™ Barrier Brace

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This component may be added to the Archer 750 and Archer 1000 to provide additional stopping power for trucks and heavy duty vehicles. The brace is quickly installed with one bolt.

Tow Bar

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A reciprocal handled, levered towing tool with variable height adjustment and two point, rapid connection interface. The tow bar easy grip handles allows on or two person teams to easily position the barriers in place.

Barrier Jack

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A high strength steel lever that allows the Archer 500, 750 and 1000 barrier wheels to easily be engaged or disengaged.

Semi-pneumatic Wheels

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Rugged, all-terrain semi-pneumatic wheel replacements for the Archer 500, 750 and 1000 barriers.

Installation Components

Earth Anchors

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Meridian’s specialized helical pier earth anchors are easily installed with a small Bobcat, Easy Auger II or other common hydraulic equipment. The design of the anchors minimizes soil disturbance during the vibration-free installation. The anchors are self-screwing and install in any weather condition with no excavation or spoils to remove.

The Meridian Advantage

Meridian’s Archer™ 1000 and 1200 Barriers are perfect solutions for:

  • Event security
  • Site construction
  • CFATS compliance
  • Maintenance support for fixed systems
  • Highway and facility construction
  • Building and facility protection
  • Perimeters and entry ways that change on a regular basis
  • Locations without electric service
  • Extreme temperature and weather conditions
  • Locations without heavy equipment to install heavy or cumbersome temporary systems

Source: betterbarriers.com

Call AML Risk Management now on 03 9326 2244 or use our contact us page here to order the Meridian Portable Crash Barrier Systems.

Planning, Prevention, Protection

Crash Barriers Save Lives

Recently in Melbourne there have been two serious incidents involving vehicular homicide. The first, in January 2017, resulted in an appalling toll of dead and injured. The second in Flinders St on the 21st of December also resulted in multiple injuries and a death.

Such acts – in both cases perpetrated by drug affected mentally ill drivers – demonstrate the need for the City of Melbourne to upgrade its access mechanisms to areas used heavily by predominantly Pedestrian traffic. Hydraulic Bollards, Boom Gates and in the case of large event crowd gatherings, Portable Crash Barriers, must be considered, installed and operated here on in. Worldwide other cities have had such devices in use now for over 10 years.

Hydraulic Bollards can be raised and lowered using sensors. These will ensure non-authorised vehicles cannot enter restricted areas such as the Bourke St Mall. These are also suitable for major Pedestrian crossings. Alternatively Boom Gates, again sensor operated, can allow access to trams or emergency vehicles, with the use of approved sensors.

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With major events AML thoroughly recommend the use of Portable Crash Barriers – see here

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With events like ‘White Night’, the ‘Chinese New Year’ and the range of Events staged throughout the year in the CBD and nearby, Crash Barriers deployed by one or two people make good sense in preventing such tragedies as experienced here, in Nice, London, New York and Berlin. Crash Barriers can stop a vehicle travelling at 50km/h completely.

Be prepared, plan and action sensible strategies as required. Much of Melbourne’s CBD Grid still operated on the same principles as were implemented in the 1960s. It’s time to update and save lines.

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cropped-profile-pic.pngFor further information about Crash Barriers please call AML on 03-9326-2244 or leave your contact details here to be contacted by one of our staff.

Planning, Prevention, Protection with AML Risk Management

A Strategic Plan will prevent another Bourke St Rampage

 

The Bourke St rampage of Jan 2017 had its first anniversary this year. With the pain and loss still raw for the families of the victims, this was a time for remembrance and healing.’

Bourke St is Melbourne’s only retail ‘main street’ Mall. The Mall, located between Elizabeth and Swanston St is banned to vehicular traffic from 6am until midnight. It can however be easily breached as the Trams have access at all times.

AML have a good knowledge of the precinct through an associate who managed portable displays in the Mall for over 10 years. The Mall can easily be locked down with sensor operated bollards or boom gates for Trams and strategically deployed florals. For major events mobile crash barriers can be situated effectively to ensure minimal risk.

We pay our respects to the victims and their families and pray that such an event doesn’t occur again. Here is the report from the ABC on the memorial ceremony and those participating.

Bourke Street car attack anniversary marked at memorial service in Melbourne

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Kurt and Emily Mudie paid tribute to their sister Jess, who died after the attack.

Family members of victims of the Bourke Street car attack have spoken of how they miss their loved ones and thanked the public for their care and support at a memorial service in Melbourne.

Six people were killed and many more injured when a car drove through the busy Bourke Street mall and along the footpath for several blocks on January 20, 2017.

Three-month-old Zachary Bryant, Thalia Hakin, 10, Matthew Si, 33, Yosuke Kanno, 25 and Jess Mudie, 22, were all killed after being hit along Bourke St.

Emily and Kurt Mudie delivered a tribute to their sister Jess, who was Emily’s twin.
“She was the most amazing person that I know, she would never ever fail to put a smile on my face, and I loved doing anything with her,” Ms Mudie said.

Ms Mudie said her sister would never leave her and continued to motivate her, as she had in life.

Mr Mudie said he had always tried to be there for his sister, but she had always been there for him.

The siblings sent love to their families and friends, to those who had been on Bourke Street on that day, and others who had lost loved ones.

“We know that this is a super-crap time, but I’m told time is a great healer and we will always be there for you if you ever need it,” Ms Mudie said.

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Matthew Si, 33, was a loving husband and father, his wife Melinda Tan said.

The wife of Matthew Si, Melinda Tan, said she had been supported by many through the heartbreak of losing her husband.

“The pain of losing Matt will never disappear,” she said.

“His time with us was cut short, he was only 33 years old and he was always rushing home to our daughter Aria.

“That day he dropped her off at childcare and never came back. I’ve had to adjust to a new life that will always be missing a loving husband and father.”

Ms Tan said she was comforted that emergency crews did their best to save her husband and that he did not suffer alone.

Melbourne Symphony Orchestra’s Sophie Rowell performed a violin solo for Mr Si, who was himself an accomplished violinist.

Matthew Bryant, the father of three-month-old Zachary Bryant, fought back tears as he spoke about his son.

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Zara (left) with her brother Zachary Bryant (right). Their father said he had looked at the two of them on Christmas morning in 2016 and thought life was perfect.

“Our connection with Zachy started long before he was born — we named him a couple of months into the pregnancy and couldn’t have been more excited to welcome that little man into our family.

“From the first time I held him, it was pure love.”

Mr Bryant said he would always be grateful and blessed to be Zachary’s father.
The couple had a third child, Zayne, last month, joining their older daughter Zara, who was with Zachary when he died.

“While he unfortunately will never have the chance to meet his older brother, we endeavour to always keep the memory of Zachy strong and alive,” Mr Bryant said.
Victorian Governor Linda Dessau honoured those who had been injured, the first responders and families who had lost loved ones.

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The families of victims and Victoria’s leaders paid tribute to emergency service workers at the memorial.

“To show that we have not forgotten your loss, and to offer you whatever support and comfort that we can.”

She also paid tribute to civilians who helped on the day.

“Those who responded when they found themselves in the midst of something for which they could not possibly have been prepared … who did all they could do to humanly help and provided us with a much appreciated beacon of hope by their goodness.”

The accused driver, James Gargasoulas, 27, has pleaded not guilty to murder and attempted murder charges.

‘Tragedy will not define us’

Premier Daniel Andrews said Victorians had responded to “one act of evil with countless acts of empathy, compassion and, most importantly, love”.

“No words will ever be enough, nothing can ever undo the damage, but I hope that there is some small measure of comfort in knowing that you are not alone,” he said.

On Saturday, which was exactly one year since the incident, a private ceremony involving family and friends of those who died, as well as those who were injured, was held at the Parliament Gardens Reserve.

Two plaques were also unveiled — one in the pavement and one on a park chair.

“In memory of those whose lives were lost in Bourke Street on 20 January 2017 and in recognition of others who were injured or affected by this tragedy,” they read.

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Flowers, toys and notes were left along Bourke Street in the days after the attack last year.

While some left flowers and notes at the reserve and also at different places along Bourke St, there was no official service on Saturday.

Source: abc.net.au